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USGS Study Reveals Mercury Contamination in Fish Nationwide

(21.08.2009)


Background:
Mercury, a neurotoxin, is one of the most serious contaminants threatening environmental waters. The main source of mercury to natural waters is mercury that is emitted to the atmosphere and deposited onto watersheds by precipitation. However, atmospheric mercury alone does not explain contamination in fish in freshwater streams. Naturally occurring watershed features, like wetlands and forests, can enhance the conversion of mercury to the toxic form, methylmercury. Methylmercury is readily taken up by aquatic organisms, resulting in contamination in fish.

The new study:
The USGS studied mercury contamination in fish, bed sediment and water from 291 streams across the nation, sampled from 1998 to 2005. Atmospheric mercury is the main source to most of these streams — coal-fired power plants are the largest source of mercury emissions in the United States — but 59 of the streams also were potentially affected by gold and mercury mining. Since USGS studies targeted specific sites and fish species, the findings may not be representative of mercury levels in all types of freshwater environments across the United States.

About a quarter of all these fish samples were found to contain mercury at levels exceeding the criterion for the protection of people who consume average amounts of fish, established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. More than two-thirds of the fish exceeded the U.S. EPA level of concern for fish-eating mammals.

“This study shows just how widespread mercury pollution has become in our air, watersheds, and many of our fish in freshwater streams,” said Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar. “This science sends a clear message that our country must continue to confront pollution, restore our nation’s waterways, and protect the public from potential health dangers.”  

Some of the highest levels of mercury in fish were found in the tea-colored or “blackwater” streams in North and South Carolina, Georgia, Florida and Louisiana — areas associated with relatively undeveloped forested watersheds containing abundant wetlands compared to the rest of the country. High levels of mercury in fish also were found in relatively undeveloped watersheds in the Northeast and the Upper Midwest. Elevated levels are noted in areas of the Western United States affected by mining. Complete findings of the USGS report, as well as additional detailed studies in selected streams, are available online.

For a national listing of fish advisories from the Environmental Protection Agency, click here.

“This study improves our understanding of where mercury ends up in fish in freshwater streams,” said USGS scientist Barbara Scudder. “The findings are critical for decision-makers to effectively manage mercury sources and to better anticipate concentrations of mercury and methylmercury in unstudied streams in comparable environmental settings.”

All 50 states have mercury monitoring programs, and 48 states issued fish-consumption advisories for mercury in 2006, the most recent year of national-scale reporting to the EPA. The EPA regulates mercury emissions to air, land and water. In February 2009, the EPA announced that it intends to control air emissions of mercury from coal-fired power plants by issuing a rule under the Clean Air Act.


Source: U.S. Department of the Interior


The cited USGS study

USGS: National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program: Mercury in Stream Ecosystems


Related News

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EVISA News, May 5, 2009: Ocean mercury on the rise

 EVISA News, February 11, 2009: Mercury in Fish is a Global Health Concern
 EVISA News, October 30, 2008: Precautionary approach to methylmercury needed
 EVISA News, March 11, 2007: Methylmercury contamination of fish warrants worldwide public warning
 EVISA News, October 9, 2006: Linking atmospheric mercury to methylmercury in fish
 EVISA News, September 23, 2006: Report Finds Mercury Contamination Permeates Wildlife Systems
 EVISA News, August 16, 2006: Mercury pollution threatens health worldwide, scientists say
 EVISA News, February 9, 2006: Study show high levels of mercury in women related to fish consumption
 EVISA News, September 13, 2005: Regulating Mercury Emissions from Power Plants: Will It Protect Our Health?
 EVISA News, August 29, 2005: Is methyl mercury limiting the delight of seafood ? - To answer this question is a challenge for elemental speciation analysis
 EVISA News, April 3, 2005: Dissension on the best way to fight mercury pollution
 EVISA News, March 20, 2005: New results on the distribution of mercury in the USA is fueling the discussion on the necessity of the reduction of its emission
 EVISA News, January 12, 2005: Number of fish meals is a good predictor for the mercury found in hair of environmental journalists
 EVISA News, April 27, 2004: FDA/EPA recommends pregnant women to restrict their fish consumption because of methylmercury content


last time modified: November 3, 2009




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