bioaccumulation

Process by which some endogenous or exogenous substances, present in small quantities, increase in concentration in an organ, an organism, a food chain, or an ecosystem.

(Translated from Parent, S. Dictionnaire des sciences de l'environnement. Broquet, Québec, 1990.)




The term "bioaccumulation" was found in the following pages:

EVISA News revisited: Dissension on the best way to fight mercury pollution | EVISA's News
Link database: USGS: Mercury in Aquatic Ecosystems
High levels of mercury in newborns likely from mothers eating contaminated fish | EVISA's News
SETAC Europe 19th Annual Meeting | EVISA's Agenda of Events
ISPTS2018: 15th International Symposium on Persistent Toxic Substances | EVISA's Agenda of Events
Natural dissolved organic matter plays dual role in cycling of mercury | EVISA's News
Link database: Illinois Teratogen Information Service: Methylmercury and Pregnancy
ISM 2019: 7th International Symposium on Metallomics | EVISA's Agenda of Events
Enhanced level of toxic methylmercury in the aquatic environment caused by hydroelectric dams | EVISA's News
Chemical speciation analysis for the life sciences | EVISA's News
Books and Special Issues on Elemental Speciation (published since 2016) | EVISA's News
Goldschmidt 2019 conference session: Trace Elements Speciation: Novel Methodologies and Insights into Transformations Influencing their Global Biogeochemical Cycle | EVISA's Agenda of Events
Directory of scientists: Vera I. Slaveykova
Types of Chemical Species | EVISA's News
Elephant Seals’ fur as a source for methylmercury in coastal sea water | EVISA's News
Seabass populations can be differentiated by their Mercury Isotope Distribution | EVISA's News
Directory of scientists: Peter G.C. Campbell
Imaging and Identification of Sulfur Species within Corals by X-ray Spectroscopy | EVISA's News
Directory of scientists: André Tessier
New study shows: Coastal water, not sediment, predicts methylmercury bioaccumulation in the marine food web | EVISA's News